Travel Myanmar | Food & Drink
12241
page-template,page-template-full_width,page-template-full_width-php,page,page-id-12241,mkd-core-1.1,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,burst-ver-2.1, vertical_menu_with_scroll,smooth_scroll,blog_installed,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-5.5.2,vc_responsive

Enjoy the exotic cuisine of Myanmar

Myanmar’s food has a special identity. Although its neighbouring countries influence the cuisine, the food has its distinct identity. A typical Myanmar meal is arranged around rice with accompanying dishes of fish or meat cooked in onion and garlic-based gravy. Soup can be clear, creamy or tart and is sipped during the meal to cleanse the palate. Salads are a popular side dish and some, such as the pickled tea leaf salad called lahpet, are eaten as snacks. Mohinga, a thick fish broth with thin rice noodles, is arguably Myanmar’s most famous national dish and is typically eaten for breakfast. Another delicious choice is the popular ohno kaukswe, a coconut-based chicken soup with noodles.

 

Tea is a staple drink in Myanmar, and tea shops are great for not only starting your day with a strong drink, but for people-watching as well. Tea is typically served hot with sweet, condensed milk added to cut its strong natural earthiness. Standout Myanmar sweets are quite simple and consist of coconut, tapioca, rice flour, and fruits. Favourites include iced coconut milk with tapioca, and Mont Lone Ye Baw, which are rice dumplings stuffed with sugar and topped with shredded coconut.

Food is our common ground, a universal experience.

RAKHINE MONT TE

 

This dish is a specialty of Rakhine State. It is made with fresh thin rice noodles and is a semi-staple dish of the people of Rakhine State. It can be had as a salad or a soup. The common version is the coup where rice vermicelli is mixed with thin soup made of daggertooth pike conger called thinbaw htoe, lemongrass and Rakhine ngapi. The dry salad form contains the same ingredients but in a colourful combination. The green chilli paste gives the white rice noodles a slightly greenish colour.

BEIN MONT (BURMESE PAN CAKE)

 

Gorge on scrumptious Myanmar style pancake made with rice flour, palm sugar, coconut chips and peanuts, garnished with poppy seeds. It is fluffy in the middle and slightly crispy on the sides. People love to have it with an extra egg atop or sprinkled with nuts, or both.

COUPLE SNACK

 

Enjoy this snack with a curious name made with a rice flour batter fried in the hemispherical shape dimpled pan and then joining two pieces together. The snack looks like a figure of a husband and wife together, due to joining the two pieces.

MONT PYAR THALAT

 

Pyar Thalat means the honeycomb. The snack is baked with a rice flour batter in the shape of a honeycomb. It is made in two varieties – with and without palm sugar syrup. Palm sugar syrup is added for a sweet taste.

Food is culture and we need to listen to it

Food is not rational. Food is culture, habit, craving and identity.

MONT LONE YAY PAW

 

Enjoy these traditional sweet rice balls when you visit Myanmar. The name denoted floating on water in Myanmarese. These are rice balls stuffed with palm sugar and grated coconut. Mote Lone Yay Paw is usually served during festivals but is nevertheless a favourite after-meal delicacy.

STICKY RICE

 

Sticky rice is a common food in Myanmar and a number of sweet and savoury items are made from it. Htamane is sticky rice-based savoury snack which is a festive delicacy in Myanmar. Both white and black rice is used to make this delicacy. Htamane is ceremoniously made during rice making competitions held in Yangon and Mandalay every year.

JAGGERY

 

Myanmar has an abundance of palm trees and hence jaggery is available in plenty in Myanmar. In fact, you might be handed over a piece of jaggery after dining at a local restaurant for finishing off the meal. So don’t forget to taste the wide variety of jaggery found in the country. You can also witness live jaggery making while visiting certain villages in the morning.

TODDY JUICE

 

If you are visiting northern Myanmar, we strongly recommend you to try the alcoholic toddy juice, which is a big part of Myanmar’s culture. You can see big and small pots hanging from palm trees where the juice is collected. This toddy is found in the rest of the country as well, but a visit to Northern Myanmar will help you see the live process of toddy-making as well.

MYANMAR BEER

 

Love beer? You got to try the Myanmar Beer brewed at the country’s brewery. The original brewery was established in 1886 during the British reign. in 1954, the Brewery was nationalised and is currently named as Myanmar Brewery Ltd. Since 2017, the brewery has started producing the first craft beer of the country – Burbrit. Do enjoy Myanmar Beer and Burbrit when you are here. Cheers!

Must-have food by region

Each town and region of Myanmar has distinctive food culture which presents an excellent opportunity for travellers to enjoy some exquisite delicacies. Each dish not only represents the culture of the region it originates in, but it also reflects the history of the place.